Selected Resources for the Standards of Professional Practice for International Education Leaders and Senior International Officers

To submit a (free) resource for consideration, please email [email protected]
Many thanks to the AIEA Editorial Committee for indexing AIEA publications and to Noel Bynum for compiling additional resources (June 2019).

Standards Links: One | Two | Three | Four | Five | Six | Seven | Eight | Nine | Ten | Eleven | Twelve | Thirteen | Fourteen | Fifteen | Sixteen | Seventeen | Eighteen | Nineteen | Twenty | Twenty-One | Twenty-Two

 

Internationalization Expertise

Standard OneUnderstands comprehensive internationalization in higher education as an inclusive process that impacts the three principal aims of the academy: teaching, research and service.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Role of Governing Boards in Campus Globalization" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Thomas Wyly and Earl Kellogg examines campus globalization as an increasingly important strategic issue in American higher education, one rarely addressed by governing boards despite the considerable international experience of many board members.  The discusses these problems and their causes, and suggests strategies SIOs can use to help the governing boards of their institutions become more engaged with internationalization.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Value of International Internships in Global Workforce Development" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Jennifer Malerich illustrates the rise of international internships as a highly sought commodity by students seeking opportunities to gain skills not possible in traditional study abroad programs. The article argues that students must be able to articulate what they learned to potential employers, a skill that can be learned when the internship is followed by a credit-bearing activity upon return to campus. 
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Value of International Internships in Global Workforce Development" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Whither Bologna?" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Paul L. Gaston reviews both powerful accomplishments to date (the “three-cycle” degree system, ECTS, emphasis on life-long learning and a “social dimension”), as well as potential “pot holes” in the road to a European Higher Education Area. Challenges identified include the growing number of signatory states, lack of funding or formal infrastructure for the process itself, as well as competing interests.

Standard Two
Recognizes the centrality of the curriculum and co-curriculum in preparing students for participation in an increasingly interconnected, diverse, and rapidly changing world. Understands how to advance global learning in the curriculum and co-curriculum in a collaborative manner.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Value of International Internships in Global Workforce Development" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Jennifer Malerich illustrates the rise of international internships as a highly sought commodity by students seeking opportunities to gain skills not possible in traditional study abroad programs. The article argues that students must be able to articulate what they learned to potential employers, a skill that can be learned when the internship is followed by a credit-bearing activity upon return to campus. 
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Internationalization and Title VI: New Challenges" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Whither Bologna?" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Paul L. Gaston reviews both powerful accomplishments to date (the “three-cycle” degree system, ECTS, emphasis on life-long learning and a “social dimension”), as well as potential “pot holes” in the road to a European Higher Education Area. Challenges identified include the growing number of signatory states, lack of funding or formal infrastructure for the process itself, as well as competing interests.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Global Learning through Partnered Inquiry" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Rebecca Hovey discusses the potential role of partnered inquiry in creating globally engaged colleges and universities that prepare students for global citizenship, that is, citizen diplomacy. Such diplomacy acknowledges the multiple affiliations of students and faculty members, and also their responsibilities to home and host communities. The brief concludes with a discussion of a pedagogical model involving community partnerships, collaborative inquiry, hands-on experience, and integrative projects.

 

Standard Three 
Has an appreciation for the risks associated with global engagement for the institution and its faculty, staff and students, and works closely with relevant others to minimize risk.

  • AIEA Town Hall Recording: "Is Our Field (and Job) in Jeopardy? Adapting and Re-inventing Internationalization of Higher Education to the Post-COVID-19 New 'Normal'"  (recording; member-only)
    The scenario for higher education in the after-COVID19 era is not precisely positive. Leaders of colleges and universities will face painful decisions in order to keep afloat institutions. But, do they consider internationalization as key component of the “new normal”, or they think that it is relatively marginal?  Sadly, the traditional business model behind the internationalization strategy of institutions -mostly focused on student mobility- has shown its fragility. Adapting and re-inventing the approach, rationale and activities, of internationalization strategies is both, urgent and needed. At the Town-Hall meeting we will discuss options and will exchange ideas. Moderator: Adel el Zaïm  (University of Ottawa); Presenter: Francisco Marmolejo (Qatar Foundation). June 2020 recording. 

 

  • "Expanding Portfolios in International Programs: Non-Credit Experiences Abroad" (AIEA Issue Brief) 
    International travel safety, often the realm of the SIO’s responsibilities, is beginning to evolve beyond ‘just’ study abroad. This issue brief discusses the growing challenges that SIOs and those responsible for international travel safety and risk management must address as international program portfolios expand to include a wide range of non-credit activities.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Role of Governing Boards in Campus Globalization" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Thomas Wyly and Earl Kellogg examines campus globalization as an increasingly important strategic issue in American higher education, one rarely addressed by governing boards despite the considerable international experience of many board members.  The discusses these problems and their causes, and suggests strategies SIOs can use to help the governing boards of their institutions become more engaged with internationalization.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Whither Bologna?" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Paul L. Gaston reviews both powerful accomplishments to date (the “three-cycle” degree system, ECTS, emphasis on life-long learning and a “social dimension”), as well as potential “pot holes” in the road to a European Higher Education Area. Challenges identified include the growing number of signatory states, lack of funding or formal infrastructure for the process itself, as well as competing interests.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Setting Up an International Office: Lessons Learned" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Joel Harrington and Dawn Turton shares a frank and detailed review of the first few years of the Vanderbilt International Office, created in 2006. Short descriptions of various processes and key activity areas such as increasing visibility, building a team, developing institutional partnerships, are each followed by important “lessons learned” that utilize the value of hindsight for the benefit of SIOs in similar positions.

Standard Four 
Has an awareness and understanding of the laws that impact significant aspects of internationalization, such as student and faculty mobility, and works with legal counsel to ensure compliance with these laws in a manner consistent with the interest of the institution and its stakeholders.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Value of International Internships in Global Workforce Development" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Jennifer Malerich illustrates the rise of international internships as a highly sought commodity by students seeking opportunities to gain skills not possible in traditional study abroad programs. The article argues that students must be able to articulate what they learned to potential employers, a skill that can be learned when the internship is followed by a credit-bearing activity upon return to campus. 
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Whither Bologna?" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Paul L. Gaston reviews both powerful accomplishments to date (the “three-cycle” degree system, ECTS, emphasis on life-long learning and a “social dimension”), as well as potential “pot holes” in the road to a European Higher Education Area. Challenges identified include the growing number of signatory states, lack of funding or formal infrastructure for the process itself, as well as competing interests.

 

Standard Five 
Has an understanding of how research on comprehensive internationalization can be used to advance the internationalization of an institution.

Leadership and Management

Standard Six
Is able to provide vision, leadership and strategic planning for internationalization.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Role of Governing Boards in Campus Globalization" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Thomas Wyly and Earl Kellogg examines campus globalization as an increasingly important strategic issue in American higher education, one rarely addressed by governing boards despite the considerable international experience of many board members.  The discusses these problems and their causes, and suggests strategies SIOs can use to help the governing boards of their institutions become more engaged with internationalization.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Whither Bologna?" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Paul L. Gaston reviews both powerful accomplishments to date (the “three-cycle” degree system, ECTS, emphasis on life-long learning and a “social dimension”), as well as potential “pot holes” in the road to a European Higher Education Area. Challenges identified include the growing number of signatory states, lack of funding or formal infrastructure for the process itself, as well as competing interests.

Standard Seven 
Has the administrative ability and insight needed to manage the complex administrative functions associated with internationalization, including enlisting the support and actions of individuals and campus units across the institution.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Value of International Internships in Global Workforce Development" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Jennifer Malerich illustrates the rise of international internships as a highly sought commodity by students seeking opportunities to gain skills not possible in traditional study abroad programs. The article argues that students must be able to articulate what they learned to potential employers, a skill that can be learned when the internship is followed by a credit-bearing activity upon return to campus. 
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Internationalization and Title VI: New Challenges" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Whither Bologna?" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Paul L. Gaston reviews both powerful accomplishments to date (the “three-cycle” degree system, ECTS, emphasis on life-long learning and a “social dimension”), as well as potential “pot holes” in the road to a European Higher Education Area. Challenges identified include the growing number of signatory states, lack of funding or formal infrastructure for the process itself, as well as competing interests.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Study Abroad in the Sciences: Increasing Disciplinary Diversity in Programming Abroad" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Preetha Ram and Phillip Wainwright highlights how science majors, including pre-med students, can find multiple benefits from participation in study abroad programs and examines both real and imagined obstacles universities face in the development of successful study abroad programs for science majors.

  • "AIEA Presidential Perspectives" (AIEA essay series)

     This series gives voice to the different ways in which higher education presidents define internationalization, align it with institutional mission and student learning outcomes, and understand both opportunities for internationalization and possible threats to it.

Standard Eight 
Understands how to facilitate the professional development of faculty and staff in support of internationalization.

Standard Nine 
Is able to effectively and appropriately communicate the work of campus internationalization to internal and external stakeholders.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Role of Governing Boards in Campus Globalization" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Thomas Wyly and Earl Kellogg examines campus globalization as an increasingly important strategic issue in American higher education, one rarely addressed by governing boards despite the considerable international experience of many board members.  The discusses these problems and their causes, and suggests strategies SIOs can use to help the governing boards of their institutions become more engaged with internationalization.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Internationalization and Title VI: New Challenges" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Global Learning through Partnered Inquiry" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Rebecca Hovey discusses the potential role of partnered inquiry in creating globally engaged colleges and universities that prepare students for global citizenship, that is, citizen diplomacy.  Such diplomacy acknowledges the multiple affiliations of students and faculty members, and also their responsibilities to home and host communities.  The brief concludes with a discussion of a pedagogical model involving community partnerships, collaborative inquiry, hands-on experience, and integrative projects.

Standard Ten 
Gathers and uses assessment data to strengthen internationalization, communicate successes and gaps, refine processes and practices, and strengthen student learning outcomes.

  • "Expanding Portfolios in International Programs: Non-Credit Experiences Abroad" (AIEA Issue Brief) 
    International travel safety, often the realm of the SIO’s responsibilities, is beginning to evolve beyond ‘just’ study abroad. This issue brief discusses the growing challenges that SIOs and those responsible for international travel safety and risk management must address as international program portfolios expand to include a wide range of non-credit activities.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Internationalization and Title VI: New Challenges" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.

Standard Eleven 
Applies principles of equity and inclusion to all aspects of Internationalization, including the hiring and retention of diverse staff.

  • AIEA Town Hall Recording: "How International Education Can Contribute to Social and Racial Justice"  (recording; member-only)
    While higher education holds the promise and potential as a great equalizer in society, we must confront the reality that it has often reproduced both inequality and exclusion. As we strive to respond to racism and injustice and to shift toward more equitable access and outcomes, what is the role of international education? Panelists will provide perspectives on how SIOs can provide leadership in this area, including equitable domestic and international student mobility, campus internationalization, and international partnerships. Presenters: Jewell Winn (Tennessee State University), Andrew Gordon (Diversity Abroad), and Rajika Bhandari (IC3 Institute); June 2020 recording. 

Advocacy (Working Through and With Others)

Standard Twelve 
Is able to effectively advocate for the institutionalization of internationalization within the context of an institution’s mission and values.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Role of Governing Boards in Campus Globalization" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Thomas Wyly and Earl Kellogg examines campus globalization as an increasingly important strategic issue in American higher education, one rarely addressed by governing boards despite the considerable international experience of many board members.  The discusses these problems and their causes, and suggests strategies SIOs can use to help the governing boards of their institutions become more engaged with internationalization.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Value of International Internships in Global Workforce Development" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Jennifer Malerich illustrates the rise of international internships as a highly sought commodity by students seeking opportunities to gain skills not possible in traditional study abroad programs. The article argues that students must be able to articulate what they learned to potential employers, a skill that can be learned when the internship is followed by a credit-bearing activity upon return to campus. 
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Internationalization and Title VI: New Challenges" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Global Learning through Partnered Inquiry" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Rebecca Hovey discusses the potential role of partnered inquiry in creating globally engaged colleges and universities that prepare students for global citizenship, that is, citizen diplomacy.  Such diplomacy acknowledges the multiple affiliations of students and faculty members, and also their responsibilities to home and host communities.  The brief concludes with a discussion of a pedagogical model involving community partnerships, collaborative inquiry, hands-on experience, and integrative projects.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Setting Up an International Office: Lessons Learned" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Joel Harrington and Dawn Turton shares a frank and detailed review of the first few years of the Vanderbilt International Office, created in 2006. Short descriptions of various processes and key activity areas such as increasing visibility, building a team, developing institutional partnerships, are each followed by important “lessons learned” that utilize the value of hindsight for the benefit of SIOs in similar positions.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Study Abroad in the Sciences: Increasing Disciplinary Diversity in Programming Abroad" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Preetha Ram and Phillip Wainwright highlights how science majors, including pre-med students, can find multiple benefits from participation in study abroad programs and examines both real and imagined obstacles universities face in the development of successful study abroad programs for science majors.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Ecotourism as an Educational Experience" by David Urias and AnnaLisa Russo (AIEA article)
    This paper uses an ecotourism program in Peru as case study of how use environmental issues to connect students to the local community and promote conservationism.
     

Standard Thirteen 
Works collaboratively with local communities to engage them in the institution’s internationalization efforts.

Standard Fourteen 
Recognizing the agency of students, actively enlists their knowledge, imaginations, and energy to advance internationalization.

Standard Fifteen 
Recognizing that the faculty are the central agents for internationalization, works to create an institutional culture that recognizes and rewards faculty for their work in advancing internationalization.

Standard Sixteen 
Is able to leverage networks to develop partnerships with individuals, institutions and organizations to advance campus internationalization.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Role of Governing Boards in Campus Globalization" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Thomas Wyly and Earl Kellogg examines campus globalization as an increasingly important strategic issue in American higher education, one rarely addressed by governing boards despite the considerable international experience of many board members.  The discusses these problems and their causes, and suggests strategies SIOs can use to help the governing boards of their institutions become more engaged with internationalization.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Value of International Internships in Global Workforce Development" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Jennifer Malerich illustrates the rise of international internships as a highly sought commodity by students seeking opportunities to gain skills not possible in traditional study abroad programs. The article argues that students must be able to articulate what they learned to potential employers, a skill that can be learned when the internship is followed by a credit-bearing activity upon return to campus. 
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Internationalization and Title VI: New Challenges" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Global Learning through Partnered Inquiry" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Rebecca Hovey discusses the potential role of partnered inquiry in creating globally engaged colleges and universities that prepare students for global citizenship, that is, citizen diplomacy.  Such diplomacy acknowledges the multiple affiliations of students and faculty members, and also their responsibilities to home and host communities.  The brief concludes with a discussion of a pedagogical model involving community partnerships, collaborative inquiry, hands-on experience, and integrative projects.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Setting Up an International Office: Lessons Learned" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Joel Harrington and Dawn Turton shares a frank and detailed review of the first few years of the Vanderbilt International Office, created in 2006. Short descriptions of various processes and key activity areas such as increasing visibility, building a team, developing institutional partnerships, are each followed by important “lessons learned” that utilize the value of hindsight for the benefit of SIOs in similar positions.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Ecotourism as an Educational Experience" by David Urias and AnnaLisa Russo (AIEA article)
    This paper uses an ecotourism program in Peru as case study of how use environmental issues to connect students to the local community and promote conservationism.

Standard Seventeen 
Understanding that governments, non-profit organizations, and the private sector help shape the environment for internationalization, is prepared to advocate for the importance of international education with these entities.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Internationalization and Title VI: New Challenges" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Whither Bologna?" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Paul L. Gaston reviews both powerful accomplishments to date (the “three-cycle” degree system, ECTS, emphasis on life-long learning and a “social dimension”), as well as potential “pot holes” in the road to a European Higher Education Area. Challenges identified include the growing number of signatory states, lack of funding or formal infrastructure for the process itself, as well as competing interests.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Global Learning through Partnered Inquiry" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Rebecca Hovey discusses the potential role of partnered inquiry in creating globally engaged colleges and universities that prepare students for global citizenship, that is, citizen diplomacy.  Such diplomacy acknowledges the multiple affiliations of students and faculty members, and also their responsibilities to home and host communities.  The brief concludes with a discussion of a pedagogical model involving community partnerships, collaborative inquiry, hands-on experience, and integrative projects.

Personal Effectiveness

Standard Eighteen 
Is able to be resourceful and entrepreneurial in securing the support, financial and otherwise, needed to advance internationalization.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Role of Governing Boards in Campus Globalization" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Thomas Wyly and Earl Kellogg examines campus globalization as an increasingly important strategic issue in American higher education, one rarely addressed by governing boards despite the considerable international experience of many board members.  The discusses these problems and their causes, and suggests strategies SIOs can use to help the governing boards of their institutions become more engaged with internationalization.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Value of International Internships in Global Workforce Development" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Jennifer Malerich illustrates the rise of international internships as a highly sought commodity by students seeking opportunities to gain skills not possible in traditional study abroad programs. The article argues that students must be able to articulate what they learned to potential employers, a skill that can be learned when the internship is followed by a credit-bearing activity upon return to campus. 
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Internationalization and Title VI: New Challenges" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Global Learning through Partnered Inquiry" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Rebecca Hovey discusses the potential role of partnered inquiry in creating globally engaged colleges and universities that prepare students for global citizenship, that is, citizen diplomacy.  Such diplomacy acknowledges the multiple affiliations of students and faculty members, and also their responsibilities to home and host communities.  The brief concludes with a discussion of a pedagogical model involving community partnerships, collaborative inquiry, hands-on experience, and integrative projects.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Setting Up an International Office: Lessons Learned" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Joel Harrington and Dawn Turton shares a frank and detailed review of the first few years of the Vanderbilt International Office, created in 2006. Short descriptions of various processes and key activity areas such as increasing visibility, building a team, developing institutional partnerships, are each followed by important “lessons learned” that utilize the value of hindsight for the benefit of SIOs in similar positions.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Study Abroad in the Sciences: Increasing Disciplinary Diversity in Programming Abroad" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Preetha Ram and Phillip Wainwright highlights how science majors, including pre-med students, can find multiple benefits from participation in study abroad programs and examines both real and imagined obstacles universities face in the development of successful study abroad programs for science majors.

Standard Nineteen 
Possesses international experience, language learning experience, and intercultural knowledge to more effectively advance campus internationalization.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Whither Bologna?" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Paul L. Gaston reviews both powerful accomplishments to date (the “three-cycle” degree system, ECTS, emphasis on life-long learning and a “social dimension”), as well as potential “pot holes” in the road to a European Higher Education Area. Challenges identified include the growing number of signatory states, lack of funding or formal infrastructure for the process itself, as well as competing interests.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Setting Up an International Office: Lessons Learned" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Joel Harrington and Dawn Turton shares a frank and detailed review of the first few years of the Vanderbilt International Office, created in 2006. Short descriptions of various processes and key activity areas such as increasing visibility, building a team, developing institutional partnerships, are each followed by important “lessons learned” that utilize the value of hindsight for the benefit of SIOs in similar positions.

Standard Twenty 
Has strong empathic instincts, is a good listener and can effectively navigate the ambiguities arising from cross-cultural encounters, thereby modeling the attitudes and skills required for intercultural and international engagement.

Standard Twenty-One 
Recognizing that internationalization is advanced through the exchange of data, ideas, and practices among SIOs and educational associations, seeks to learn from and contribute to this exchange.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: The Role of Governing Boards in Campus Globalization" (AIEA Article)
    This paper by Thomas Wyly and Earl Kellogg examines campus globalization as an increasingly important strategic issue in American higher education, one rarely addressed by governing boards despite the considerable international experience of many board members.  The discusses these problems and their causes, and suggests strategies SIOs can use to help the governing boards of their institutions become more engaged with internationalization.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Internationalization and Title VI: New Challenges" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Ann Imlah Schneider offers an overview of the major challenges that have been met by the Title VI legislation as it has evolved over the past fifty years. It then enumerates current and anticipated challenges as of February 2010 for Title VI specifically and, more generally, for efforts to inject more international content into the curricula of education in the United States.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Global Learning through Partnered Inquiry" (AIEA Article)
    This occasional paper by Rebecca Hovey discusses the potential role of partnered inquiry in creating globally engaged colleges and universities that prepare students for global citizenship, that is, citizen diplomacy.  Such diplomacy acknowledges the multiple affiliations of students and faculty members, and also their responsibilities to home and host communities.  The brief concludes with a discussion of a pedagogical model involving community partnerships, collaborative inquiry, hands-on experience, and integrative projects.
  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Setting Up an International Office: Lessons Learned" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Joel Harrington and Dawn Turton shares a frank and detailed review of the first few years of the Vanderbilt International Office, created in 2006. Short descriptions of various processes and key activity areas such as increasing visibility, building a team, developing institutional partnerships, are each followed by important “lessons learned” that utilize the value of hindsight for the benefit of SIOs in similar positions.

Standard Twenty-Two 
Has a deep commitment to preserving high ethical standards in all internationalization efforts.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper—Setting Up an International Office: Lessons Learned" (AIEA Article)

    This occasional paper by Joel Harrington and Dawn Turton shares a frank and detailed review of the first few years of the Vanderbilt International Office, created in 2006. Short descriptions of various processes and key activity areas such as increasing visibility, building a team, developing institutional partnerships, are each followed by important “lessons learned” that utilize the value of hindsight for the benefit of SIOs in similar positions.

  • "AIEA Occasional Paper: Ecotourism as an Educational Experience" by David Urias and AnnaLisa Russo (AIEA article)
    This paper uses an ecotourism program in Peru as case study of how use environmental issues to connect students to the local community and promote conservationism.